Wednesday, 8 September 2010

A war of words

Almost every morning I walk through Paddington station on my way to work. There's a little booth where they sell smoothies made with fresh fruit which are rather nice, and a good way to start the working day.

I order my smoothie, and as it's being made, I pay. Whenever I pay, the staff ask "would you like a pastry with that?"

I don't want a pastry with my smoothie and say "no thank you".

But that got me to thinking - is there a way in which I could ask for my smoothie in such a way that I won't get asked if I want a pastry at all. Saying "I would like a mango smoothie but I don't want a pastry" is a little direct and maybe a little rude.

I've tried "I would just like a smoothie". I've tried "I would like just a smoothie". I've tried "I'd just like a smoothie today please". And I always get asked if I would like a pastry.

So - I give up - I cannot think of a way to ask for my smoothie which precludes the staff from asking if I want a pastry but which doesn't make it clear that I know they're going to ask about pastries.

Suggestions welcome...

1 comment:

  1. That makes me think of: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/7949440/English-professor-thrown-out-of-Starbucks-after-objecting-to-corporate-language.html

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